Ogie

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Ogie with Mookie and Fancy in the background

I was prepared for the stench of suffering and hopelessness in that barn. I was prepared for manure-encrusted floors and walls, for cows chained in misery, suffering silently while large eyes followed my movements. Every time I walk into a place of suffering such as this one, I leave a piece of my soul with the ones I can’t save, offering deep prayers and salty tears in exchange for a lifetime of brutality.

 

I was there to rescue one baby boy calf, who had been born two days before and was slated to be shipped to a veal farm later that day. But I was in for a surprise. Another calf, Ogie, had been born in the night, and the farmer was willing to allow me to take both babies home.

 

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Baby Ogie

 

Ogie was born into bloodshed and death on that cold March morning, in that dark, dirty barn heated only by the manure and breath of hundreds of cows chained in stanchions. Unbeknownst to me until several days later, his mother hemorrhaged after giving birth to him, but she didn’t die right away. The farmer kept her alive, milking her for two more days while she lay covered in manure on a cold concrete floor, bleeding to death. This is not meant to be an indictment. I know the farmer was desperate. But still, it caused the cows great pain.

Ogie and Nandi would have been sold to a veal farm. This farmer told me repeatedly that he didn’t like taking babies from their mothers, and that he hated selling them for veal. He also shared with me how overwhelming his work was, and that he hated the poor conditions of the cows. He said the work was too much for him, and that he couldn’t afford help to take better care of the cows. Competing against industrial dairies, this farmer suffered almost as much as his cows. I implored him to leave the industry. Working 16-hour days and hovering just above poverty-level for his efforts, he remained convinced that there was no other way for him to survive. Family farmers, too, suffer at the hands of corporate farming. Very few people win in the harsh and strange economy of the modern “food system”.

But I don’t want to tell you about facts and figures. Those, you can find everywhere with a simple internet search.

I want to tell you how I felt when two days later I returned at the moment of Ogie’s mother’s death.

I had come hoping for milk for the babies, not knowing that Ogie’s mother had been down since giving birth. When I found her moaning in pain, covered in manure, I could see that she was fighting to stay alive. Instinctively, I knew why. Her baby. She was staying alive for her baby. I wiped the manure from her face and looked her in the eye. “Your baby is safe. I took him to Indraloka, where cows are free. I’ll care for him every day of his life, I promise you.”

She laid her head on my lap and exhaled for the last time, and in that sacred moment, I was changed. It was as if she imbued in me all of her motherly love and strength when I made that vow.

 

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Baby Nandi kisses sick baby Ogie

 

***

I kept my promise. I did everything I could, every day of my life from then until now, not only to keep Ogie safe but also to protect the hundreds of other mothers’ babies for whom I now care. I think of her every night and pray that I can be half the nurturer and protector she was.

Ogie was named after a close friend of mine who died just around the time of his birth. Ogema was an Anishinaabe Medicine Man from whom I learned a great deal, although probably not enough.

So, Ogie was born into bloodshed and death, but also great hope. Nandi, the calf born the day before Ogie, saved his life by leading me to him. Those two little calfs were so tiny that I was able to take them home in the back of my small SUV.

 

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Baby Nandi

 

At first, Ogie was very sick and used to sleep for hours on my lap while Nandi frolicked quietly nearby. Have you ever experienced another being placing all of their trust in you? Do you know the feeling of innocent eyes looking at yours as if they are sure there is no problem in the world that you can’t solve? Have you ever breathed in the scent of a newborn, and in that breath, recognized the prayer for peace and safety that simply wafts from all innocent young beings? It made me a better person, his faith. Happily, we were able to get him the veterinary care he needed, and he soon grew strong and healthy.

For months, my days were punctuated with the big eyes and sweet moos of calfs awaiting warm milk. I had to bottle feed them at the same time, or they would jostle in an attempt at both getting their bottle first. By the time they had been with me a week, they were both the same size as me, and much, much stronger. After two weeks, they were both significantly larger than me. And of course, they just kept growing. So, I devised a system of bracing myself against the barn wall, a bottle in each hand, also braced against the wall. I was able to use the wall to hold me and the bottles steady, no matter how the calfs pushed and jostled as they nursed.

Holsteins are bred to be unnaturally large so that they can produce more milk. However, outside of a sanctuary setting, males rarely live past a few weeks. A few bulls are kept for breeding, but frozen semen is usually shipped far and wide. As a result, rarely do any of us see a full-grown Holstein male.

I knew from the day he was born that his size would probably kill him. I knew every time I fed him and scratched him and marveled at how healthy and strong he was that someday his big body would betray him.

Ogie grew to be larger than a full grown male moose, with horns. Often visitors, seeing him tower above us, feared him despite his gentle nature.  All I could see were those same big baby eyes. I didn’t care how big he got, he would always be that same, sweet calf that I loved so much, and I believe that to him, I would always be the woman who tried so hard to make up for the loss of his mother. He trusted me and I would do anything for him.

 

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Regal Ogie

 

So, of course, I understood that someday, he’d grow so large that his legs would no longer hold him. I just kept hoping that someday would be many, many days and years from now.

But it wasn’t.

It was a Friday morning in 2018.  We found him down in the icy pasture and unable to rise. We worked for hours in the cold, trying every single way we knew how to get him up. His herd– cows, horses, a goat, and a cat–  watched us anxiously, comforting him with kisses and cheering us on with looks and moos of encouragement. His eyes held fear, but also that same faith he had in me since he was a sick, little, orphaned calf. I would have given anything to get him up. A small army of humans worked alongside me, and every one of us would have gladly given all that was in us if we could have spared him this pain, or given him another day of joy.

We called experts near and far. We consulted with multiple vets. We pulled out every piece of lifesaving equipment available for cows. We used every ounce of ingenuity we could muster, and every bit of strength our pathetic little human bodies had to offer.

Finally, we were able to get equipment large enough to lift him, but his legs wouldn’t hold him up. He collapsed in a heap, moaning in pain, imploring me with his big baby eyes. Ogie wanted to live, but his body couldn’t comply.  It was clear, from his attempts to stand when lifted, that one of his back hips was broken. There was nothing more we could do.

 

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Ogie relaxing with Mookie (cow) and Wesley T. Monkey (cat)

 

I called the vet, and together we waited. Humans, cows, horses, a goat, and cats gathered around him, all of us crying into his thick, lustrous fur. If you have never seen a cow cry, you should know that tears actually stream down their faces, just like ours. Several of our young calfs, with whom Ogie used to play so gently, sobbed aloud. The adult cows cried silently, as did I.

“Someday I’ll wish upon a star and wake up where the clouds are far behind me,” my voice broke as I tried to sing his favorite lullaby. His eyes never left mine. “Away above the chimney tops, where troubles melt like lemon drops, that’s where you’ll find me.”

I called on his mother’s spirit to take him home.

Together, we took one last gulp of delicious air. As one, we expelled it. The light faded from his eyes. The rest of us breathed on as his mother’s spirit came to gather him up and take him home.

“Somewhere over the rainbow, skies are blue,” I promised him, “and the dreams that we dare to dream really do come true.”

 

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What a blessing to walk with him for a short while

 

Please share your memories of Ogie, or another cow you have loved and lost, in the comments below. We love reading them!

10 thoughts on “Ogie

    mexiquedecor said:
    February 8, 2019 at 4:04 pm

    What a beautiful, compassionate person you are, and eloquent, too. R.I.P. Ogie.

    Liked by 1 person

    Marie said:
    February 8, 2019 at 5:00 pm

    I’m sobbing. I’m so sorry, for Ogie, for his mother, for all suffering animals at the hands of humans. RIP

    Liked by 1 person

      indralokaanimalsanctuary responded:
      February 8, 2019 at 9:05 pm

      Marie, there is so much pain in this world…and yet, so much reason to hope. So, cry all you need to. And then we will stand up together and work twice as hard to spread kindness far and wide.

      Liked by 1 person

    mexiquedecor said:
    February 8, 2019 at 9:38 pm

    That would be a noble gesture for all of us. We must strive to measure up to your kindness and compassion.

    Like

    Stacey said:
    February 9, 2019 at 8:24 pm

    Crying… Such amazing beings, so wonderful and deserving of respect, empathy, compassion, and lives free from abuse and exploitation. Thank you so much for all you do and for recognizing such. You are an angel. ❤

    Like

    Barbara Pearl said:
    February 10, 2019 at 11:29 pm

    I truly wish Ogie did not have to die and this accident could have been prevented. How can you prevent this kind of suffering from happening again to other farm animals?

    Like

      indralokaanimalsanctuary responded:
      February 11, 2019 at 5:40 pm

      Barbara, thanks so much for your deep concern for Ogie and our other beloved animals. If Ogie slipped because of the ice, he was the first of well over 1,000 animals to do so in the nearly 20 years I have been rescuing farm animals. Cows are very unhappy inside, so I do not feel that locking them inside barns for most of the winter to avoid the very slim chance of falling is an option. Because full grown Holstein steers are so large, other sanctuaries have experienced them splaying their hips too far when they fall asleep standing up. We have no way of knowing if this is what happened to Ogie. Unfortunately with other animals as with us humans, accidents do happen.

      Like

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